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Reading: Online Course Engagement Among Undergraduate Nursing Student Veterans

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Online Course Engagement Among Undergraduate Nursing Student Veterans

Authors:

Daisha J Cipher,

University of Texas at Arlington, US
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Regina W Urban,

University of Texas at Arlington, US
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Jeanean Boyd,

University of Texas at Arlington, US
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Mary E Mancini

University of Texas at Arlington, US
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Abstract

As a result of the Post-9/11 Veterans Assistance Act, academic programs aimed at assisting student veterans to become Registered Nurses (RN) are increasing. Accordingly, the number of nursing academic programs being offered online are increasing, yet little is known about online student veterans’ behaviors within learning management systems (LMS). This study examined the patterns of LMS use among student veterans who are pursuing a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) and the association between these behaviors and academic success. A retrospective associational analysis was conducted with data collected from students enrolled in courses in an online BSN program. The multilevel data consisted of 528 students who took one or more of twelve courses. The sample consisted of 23 veterans and 505 non-veteran BSN (non-VBSN) students in 3,793 course enrollments. Veterans were more likely to be male and were less likely to be classified as an in-state resident. Overall, the students engaged in their LMS early and most did not have missing or late assignments. The amount of online time spent in each course and the number of late assignment submissions significantly predicted course grades. No other significant predictors of graduation, discontinuation, or grades emerged. Notwithstanding some demographic differences, veterans appeared to be comparable to their non-VBSN counterparts overall, in terms of both academic performance and online engagement. These results indicate that the time students spend in their online courses can predict program success. The creation of an early-identification process for at-risk students who are not engaging in their LMS might have the potential to enhance educational outcomes even further.
How to Cite: Cipher, D.J., Urban, R.W., Boyd, J. and Mancini, M.E., 2018. Online Course Engagement Among Undergraduate Nursing Student Veterans. Journal of Veterans Studies, 4(1), pp.1–14. DOI: http://doi.org/10.21061/jvs.v4i1.65
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Published on 17 Dec 2018.
Peer Reviewed

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